Women in Research (WIRe) finds Japan lacking in gender parity

    Women in Research (WIRe) finds Japan lacking in gender parity

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    Women in Research (WIRe) has conducted an industry wide study “Gender and Career Advancement in the Research Industry” and has released Japan-specific findings from the data collected.

    The release was the key feature of WIRe’s inaugural event in Tokyo during the JMRA Annual Conference. JMRA began the session by introducing the work they are doing in support of “Redefining the Way We Work”. Vanessa Oshima, a WIRe Global Advisory Board Member, introduced WIRe and its mission and objectives. Eri Yamazaki of Coca-Cola Japan, and the WIRe Tokyo event lead, then shared the results of the recent WIRe study. This was followed by a panel discussion on the study results with Noriko Nakano of L’Oreal Japan; Noriko Hayashi of Phillip Morris International; and Shinichiro Oka of Macromill.

    “When we analyzed the Japan findings from our study, it was clear that there are many opportunities for our Japanese colleagues to meet the challenges facing gender equality in the workplace,” said Kristin Luck, founder of Women in Research.

    “As a country, Japan is struggling to keep up with the global pace of advancements in gender parity. Rather than feeling discouraged by these findings, we believe there are many opportunities to improve the state of women in the workplace in Japan through WIRe’s programming and services, and we are very excited about the launch of our presence in Toyko.”

    WIRe’s global survey, created in partnership with global market research firm Lieberman Research Worldwide and with data collection support from FocusVision received nearly 1,000 responses from both female and male market research professionals around the world. Sample partners included ESOMAR, Greenbook and Qualitative Research Consultants Association (QRCA). In Japan, the sample consisted of 190 respondents. The survey covered questions that correlated with the original 2012 study on issues like compensation, children and family issues, job satisfaction and job responsibility levels.

    Web : https://www.womeninresearch.org